Buckwheat pie with beets and red onion – GF

beet pie-2

Buckwheat pie with beets and red onion

• 375 g buckwheat flour
• 125 g butter
• ½ tsp salt
• ½ tsp baking powder
•5 to 6 Tbsp water

• 4 to 5 red onions
• 2 Tbsp olive oil
• salt
• 2 Tbsp butter
• 2 Tbsp balsamic glaze (or aged balsamic vinegar)
• 2,5 dl red wine (like cabernet, merlot)
• 400 g raw grated red beet
• 1 big garlic pod
• 3 eggs
• 40 ml cooking cream
• 70 g feta
• fresh thyme
• salt, pepper
• handful of walnuts
• feta, fresh mint and thyme to garnish


  1. Dough: mix flour, salt and baking powder. Add cold butter cut in cubes. Mix evenly with fingers. Add water. Kneed and form a ball. Place in the fridge for at least an hour.
  2. Chop onions. Heat 2 Tbsp olive oil, add chopped onions and stir fry for 1 – 2 mins. Add salt and continue stirring. Than add butter and balsamic glaze. Cover for couple of minutes and continue cooking. Start adding the wine, but not all at once. Keep sauteing until wine has evaporated and onions softened.
  3. Grate raw beets. In a big bowl mix grated beets, sauted onions, chopped garlic, eggs and cooking cream. Add feta and thyme. Salt and pepper according to taste.
  4. Take the dough out of the fridge. Roll out in between two sheets of baking paper. Remove the upper sheet of paper and transfer the dough to a pie mold. Bake in preheated vent oven for 5 mins at 190 °C.
  5. Take the dough out of the oven, add the filling and garnish with feta and walnuts in the middle. Put back in the oven and bake for 30 – 35 mins at  190 °C.
  6. When baked, garnish with fresh mint and thyme.

beet pie

This recipe was made for Spar Slovenija and their magazine Dobro zame.

Rainy days and misty mornings…

fig chia pudding-5

Autumn. It has really started now. You know it for sure, when there’s no sun in the morning. Just gray mist flowing above the city. And rain. Gray, misty, humid. And calm. No kids runing around and playing on the street. Nothing exciting, noting worth getting up actually. I could easily stay in my bed for the rest of the day. With a good book and a cup of tea, listening to the rain touching the ground…

But I have to get up… First thing: coffee. Second thing: breakfast. I always take time for my breakfast. And coffee. It’s a ritual and the most important meal of the day. It starts the engine so it really has to be something good for the body and the soul (I mean for my eyes).

In the morning your body needs energy. Lots of it. So eating fruit in the morning is the right way to start the day. Fresh figs. They’ve been collecting the sun rays all the summer to rejoice with their sweetness in the fall.

There are bananas and there are frozen bananas. I’ve been going mad for banana ice-ceream this summer. It’s basically just mixing frozen bananas in food processor until they turn into a smooth and creamy ice-cream.  With a spoon of peanut butter and coconut you’ve got yourself a pure sugar free magic! But that’s for some other time…

And last but not the least, with this rainy and much colder days ahead, you need to boost your body and prepare it for the winter. A spoon of bee pollen a day makes miracles. And brings the sunshine to your day!

Be good people and start your day the right way!

fig chia pudding
Chia pudding with coconut and frozen banana


chia pudding:

  • 500 ml plain yogurt
  • 2 frozen bananas
  • 4 Tbsp ground coconut
  • ½ vanilla pod
  • 8 Tbsp chia seeds

to garnish:

  • handful of frozen raspberries
  • 2 figs
  • 2 tsp bee pollen


  1. Finely grind coconut using a coffee grinder.
  2. Mix yogurt, vanilla, chia seeds and coconut. Let sit overnight in the fridge.
  3. Peel bananas and let freeze overnigh in the freezer.
  4. Next day, mix bananas and chia yogurt by using a food processor, blender or hand mixer.
  5. Divide in glasses, sprinkle with frozen raspberries, fresh figs and bee pollen.

Falling leaves and comfort food…


falling leaves

In the morning I took a bike ride down to the city centre. Just like every other day. It was a beautiful day. As I was driving my face was bathing in the sun. But suddenly I could smell winter…  I passed exactly one year off, doing the things I like, focusing on myself, going to parties, meeting new extraordinary interesting people. And then, just before summer, the bubble I was living in, popped and I had to switch all that for a library lamp and a pile of books. I’ve passed them, my first two finals, but the saga continues… I have no idea what happened to this summer, it just went by too quickly. I woke up this sunday and realized that the leaves started falling off. Yellow leaves.

plum pie-3

Big granny’s sweater, warm socks, a cup of tea, more books and this asocial life I was forced into… I was desperately in need of something sweet, warm and comforting. Pies can’t really save the world, but this one did save me and my sunday. And luckily, I managed to save some of the last plums from my parent’s garden.

plum pie

Plum pie with walnut rye crust*

* this also works well with apples or pears


  • 200 g rye flour
  • 100 g cold butter
  • 80 g ground walnuts or pecans
  • 2 eggs
  • pinch of salt
  • 1 Tbsp agave syrup or honey (or similar)


  • 750 g very ripe plums
  • cinnamon
  • ½ vanilla pod or 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 3 eggs
  • 50 ml liquid cream
  • 2 Tbsp cornstarch
  • 2 big Tbsp 100% apricot jam


  1. Dough: mix flour, ground walnuts or pecans and salt. Add cold butter cut in cubes and mix evenly with fingers. Mix 2 eggs and agave syrup or honey, then add to the flour mixture. Mix evenly and form a ball. Warp in plastic foil and let sit in the fridge for an hour.
  2. Take the dough out of the fridge and roll out between two sheets of baking paper. Place the dough in the greesed baking tin.
  3. Mix two eggs, add liquid cream, cornstarch and apricot jam.
  4. Pour the egg mixture on the dough, then add plums. Sprinkle with cinnamon.
  5. Bake in vent oven 30 – 35 min at 190°C.


Raspberry & greek yogurt cheesecake

raspb cheesecake-12

Thinking of all the things that have happened in last two years since I got diabetes kinda makes my head spin. And it actually did turn my life upside down. I guess it was ment to be. As that happened I decided to only do things I enjoy doing. Life is too short to waste it on things that are not important. Since, I have never been happier.

If you want changes in your life, you have to get out of your comfort zone. Act differently as you normally would. And follow things you love. And basically this is how the idea for a new culinary magazine Radegunda started, according to Polona Klančnik.

I couldn’t be happier meeting people who have decided to take control over their life, leave all the burdens behind and start something new and exciting. Creative, happy and satisfied looking towards the new adventures.

Creating a new culinary magazine will most definitely be very interesting and exciting adventure. As thing are set, I am sure that the stories it will write and the people it will present, will get the readers hungry for more.

Polona, Mateja, Kristina, Tamara, Polona, of course, Radegunda, I wish you all the best!

Now get your magazine, where besides this recipe you will find all sorts of interesting and delicious stories!


raspb cheesecake-2



  • 40 g pitted dates
  • juice of 2 oranges
  • 80 g ground rolled oats
  • 200 g almonds
  • 2 Tbsp ground chia
  • 2 Tspb coconut flour


  • 1 kg greek yogurt
  • 150 g coconut butter
  • 300 g raspberries
  • grated dark chocolate
  • mint leaves
  • 6 tsp sucralose or stevia
  • peel of 3 organic lemons


  1. Drain greek yoghurt: put a cheesecloth into a strainer and place over a large bowl into which you will collect excess water from yoghurt. Pour in your greek yoghurt, put into the fridge overnight. The longer it drains the firmer it gets.
  2. Coconut butter: blend shreded coconut (at least 400g) until they turn into a liquid and smooth coconut butter. You can use coconut oil instead. For details check here.
  3. Using a cofee grinder, grind rolled oats and chia seeds into a flour consistency.
  4. In a food processor mix dates and almonds. Add rolled oata, chia coconut flour and juice of two oranges. Mix once more to combine all the ingredients.
  5. Line a 24cm cake ring with baking paper. Add the crust mixture and press well to form an even bottom.
  6. Mix drained greek yogurt, peel of three organic lemons and a sweetener of your choice. Than add liquid coconut butter or coconut oil while mixing.
  7. Spread two tablespoons of yogurt mixture over the cake crust. Evenly add a layer of raspberries and greated chocolate. Pour over the rest of the yogurt mixture
  8. Let set in the fridge for at least 6 – 7 h, the best overnight.
  9. Decorate with raspberries, chocolate chunks and mint leaves.

raspb cheesecake-4

Fig galette

fig galette

I’ve been just too busy lately, so I’m leaving you with this. Makes a perfect combo with a glass of cold prosecco. And (I actually can’t believe I’m saying this since it’s like 35ºc outside) is totally worth of heating up the kitchen.

Be good!
Lots of ice cold Prosecco!
And enjoy the summer!




  • 100 g wholegrain spelt flour
  • 50 g butter
  • 40 g ground walnuts
  • 1 egg
  • pinch of salt


  • 4 – 5 big figs
  • 80 g sheep’s milk cheese
  • 3 Tbsp balsamic glaze
  • salt
  • fresh thyme
  • two handfuls walnuts


  1. Mix flour, ground walnuts and salt. Add cubes of cold butter and mix evenly. Add and egg. Wrap in plastic foil and let sit in the fridge for 30 mins to 1 hour.
  2. Roll out the dough between two sheets of baking paper.
  3. Cut figs and cheese. Put in the middle of the dough, sprinkle with salt, fresh thyme, balsamic glaze and roughly crushed walnuts. Fold in the dough.
  4. Bake at vent option at 190ºC until cheese is lightly browned (about 20 – 25 mins).

Strawberry galette

jagodna pita-9

It’s been three years since I’ve started my balcony garden. It had its ups and downs. Tomatoes, cucumbers, paprikas, herbs and spinach all worked well, but there were some serious fails with pumpkins and artichokes. And strawberries weren’t any success either so far. I wasn’t even planing to plant them this year but something was telling me I should…

jagodna pita

And it turned out to be a good decision, because this year I indeed have strawberries growing at my balcony! They are absolutely delicious, and to be honest, they went straight to my yoghurt in the morning. I would not dare to cook them. But they did inspire me to make this strawberry galette.

jagodna pita-8



  • 60 g rolled oats
  • 50 g wholegrain spelt flour
  • 80 g shredded coconut
  • 45 g cold butter
  • 1 Tbsp agave syrup or honey
  • 1 egg yolk
  • pinch of salt
  • 30 ml cold water (or more if needed)


  • 300 – 350 g strawberries
  • 3 Tbsp chia
  • 1 big Tbsp strawberry jam (I used 100% fruit content jam)
  • 1/2 of vanilla pod
  • 1 – 2 Tbsp stevia or sucralose


  1. Grind rolled oats and coconut in coffee grinder to obtain flour consistency.
  2. Mix all the flours and salt, than add cold butter and mix evenly. Add agave syrup or honey and egg yolk. Mix and add water as needed. Form a ball, wrap it in plastic foil and let sit in the fridge for 30 mins.
  3. Cut strawberries in half. Mix all the ingredients for filling.
  4. Take the dough out of the fridge. Roll it out in between two sheets of baking paper. Put all the filling in the middle and fold the ends inwards.
  5. Bake for 25 – 35 mins at 180ºc.
  6. Sprinkle with mint leaves. And yes… vanilla ice cream is always a good idea!

jagodna pita-12

Tabbouleh: there’s never too much mint. Or olive oil.


I was sitting on my balcony, chilling, looking at my vegetables and thinking what to prepare for lunch. That gorgeous green mint caught my eye and made me think of something… It’s been almost 10 years now, since I visited France for the first time. It must have been then that I’ve fallen in love with it… Anyway, I was staying with a family in Antibes, in the south. Tabbouleh was le plat de resistance. Every day. Every lunch. It was more or less a cous-cous salad with some tomatoes, raisins and mint. To be honest, I was not a big fan. It was something I’ve never had in my life before. But, years pass by and you get wiser… and you travel (now a visit to a local Lebanese is practically a must on all my trips), returning at home, hoping that one day you’ll be able to sit down in an restaurant ordering some hummus, falafels and tabouleh in your home town. And one day when you return, your wish comes true. Mezze.

Tabbouleh comes from Middle Eastern cuisine and is usually served as mezze. It’s fresh, healthy and really easy to make in the summer. The real thing is actually lots of mint and parsley, tomatoes, some onions, sprinkeled with lemon and some bulgur. Yes, sprinkeled with bulgur.

My recipe is a mix of everything. Cranberries and pistachios came across when I was staying in Canada. And bulgur is so much healthier than cous-cous. It’s not that common to use it at our place, but you should definitely be using it more. Bulgur is cracked durum wheat and is considered wholegrain, so rich in fibre and has approx. 10% of protein. It is made by cooking the wheat, drying it, partially removing bran and craking it. This actually means that there is no need to cook it. You can just soak it and drain when soften.

So, serve it with one of these beauties  plus some grilled vegetables. And you’ve got yourself a real feast!



  • 250 g bulgur
  • 350 g cherry tomatoes
  • 2 big handfuls cranberries (or raisins)
  • 150 g salted pistachios in shell
  • 20 g mint leaves or more
  • 15 g parsley
  • 1 small spring onion
  • juice of 1,5 lemon
  • 1 Tbsp aged balsamic vinegar.
  • salt
  • olive oil. lots of it.


  1. Cook bulgur according to instructions. Do not overcook. Let cool completely.
  2. Chop mint leaves, parsley and spring onions. Cut cherry tomatoes in half. Remove pistachios from the shelves and chop roughly.
  3. Add lemon juice, balsamic vinegar and lots of olive oil to cooled bulgur. Mix in pistachios, cranberries, chopped herbs and spring onions. Salt according to taste and mix. At the end mix in cherry tomatoes and serve.

BBQ season: best dips for roasted veggies

namazi-4Last weekend was the official barbecue season opening at our house. And we had a good reason for it. We were celebrating the release of a new album of a band my dad plays at. Demolition group. I was growing up with the band and their music, but never considered them like big stars. They were more of a  family. I think it was not until I’ve grown up (hope my dad won’t be reading this. lol) that I realised how significant actually is what they are doing.

It was a lovely day, we had great time and we ate well.

Usually there’s a lot of meat when you organise a barbecue. Luckily I was not the only vegetarian and there was abandonce of meat free dishes. As far as I’m concerned, the best concept for a barbecue is to follow the mezze principle, as I call it. Small, fresh, colorful sides that accompany the main thing, so that everyone is satisfied, veggie and meat lovers. I was thinking, what would go best with grilled vegetables and came up with these three easy and delicious dips:


Greek yoghurt with lemon, mint and black olive paste 


  • 1 kg greek yoghurt
  • peel of 5 organic lemons
  • 1 – 2 tsp salt
  • mint leaves
  • 80 g black olives
  • 6 Tbsp olive oil

For this recipe you will need a cheesecloth


  1. Drain greek yoghurt: put cheesecloth into a strainer and place over a large bowl into which you will collect excess water from yoghurt. Pour in your greek yoghurt, put into the fridge for at least a day. The longer it drains the firmer it gets.
  2. The next day, mix drained yoghurt with salt and peel of 4 organic lemons.
  3. Mix olives and olive oil and grind into a paste using a mortar or food processor. You can also leave larger pieces of olives.
  4. Put the lemon yoghurt into a larger bowl, garnish with black olive paste. Grate zest of 1 lemon and sprinkle with fresh mint leaves. Sprinkle with olive oil.


Chickpea, roasted red peppers and walnut dip


  • 10 -12 long red peppers
  • 1 can chickpea
  • 2 handfuls of walnuts or pecans
  • 1 garlic clove
  • 6 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 2 tsp ground coriander
  • 1 – 2 tsp salt
  • garnish: feta, coriander or parsley leaves, olive oil


  1. Oven roast peppers at 200°C until soft and well grilled. You can also barbecue them. Let cool and remove the skins.
  2. Put skinned peppers, drained chickpeas, walnuts or pecans, garlic, lemon juice, ground coriander and salt into a food processor and mix into a smooth paste.
  3. Garnish with crumbled feta, fresh herbs and sprinkle with olive oil.



White bean and almond butter hummus


  • 1 can white beans
  • 3 big Tbsp almond butter (you can also replace it with 3 handfuls of almonds)
  • 1 small tsp salt
  • 6 Tbsp lemon juice
  • 3 – 4 Tbsp water
  • ½ garlic clove
  • 1 tsp cumin (Cuminum cyminum) – optional
  • garnish: avocado, olive oil, cranberries or pomegranate, sesame


  1. Make almond butter: you will need at least 400 g almonds. Mix them in a food processor or a blender at highest speed until oils get to separate and grounded almonds turn into a smooth butter. You can substitute almond butter by 3 handfuls of almonds, but the consistency will be less smooth.
  2. Put all the ingredients into a food processor and mix into a smooth paste at the highest speed. Add water according to the thickness you prefer.
  3. Garnish with slices of avocado, pieces of cranberries or pomegranate, sesame and sprinkle with olive oil.



Be good! Enjoy in sunny days!

DG – U tvojim očima

Friends. Sun. Food. Wine.


I’m not the kind of a person who could settle down. Ever. But as it happens I’ve been in Ljubljana for some time now.  It’s a phase. I’ve got things to finish here. I actually never imagined living here, but since I’m here I want to get the best out of it. Ljubljana has changed a lot since I first came.  It has a small but lively cultural scene. And I love how close everything is around here. An hour of ride and you’ll find yourself in a completely different scenery, with completely different traditions and of course, food.

What I’ve noticed is that in recent years food culture in Slovenia has changed a lot. To better. And it was about time. It’s also thanks to the projects like Restaurant week. So, me and my girls decided to test it out and we set off to the western part of Slovenia and the coast.

brdaOur first stop was at Goriška Brda. It’s one of my favourite regions. Really charming in the summer when all you see are hillsides covered in vines and old villages making you feel like you were in some other time and place. And in the spring, there’s nothing better to escape from Ljubljana and indulge the sun and the flowering trees.

The reason we came to Brda was the Restaurant week. We were off to see and taste what’s cookin at Kabaj’s. As I think to it now, their menu was great. Local cheese, tipical egg omlets, greens, really good quality oils. You could actually taste spring. There was something in their dishes reminding me  it still gets fresh in the night, but at the same time the nature is awaking and warming up the soil. Fresh ingredients prepared in the local manner and some excellent Pinot Blanc, 2010. I couldn’t imagine anything ealse to pair with my vegetarian menu. I definitely have to return to try their other wines.

We stayed at a lovely family run estate called Kmetija Šibav. The hospitality and generosity of our host trully was unprecedented, and the experience we’ve got was really something we did not expect. They made us a really interesting presentation of their wines. The appartment was great and in the morning we were woken up by the brightes sun and the most beautiful view I could imagine. They made us a generous and delicious breakfast full of homemade goodies and we were good to set off to new adventures. We left with warmth in our hearts, smile on our faces and a car packed with gifts from our hosts. And of course, lovely homegrown lemons, that were later used for the most perfect Easter braid.

We did a tour around Brda, walking in between vines and exploring old villages. Trying to find a spot to rest and enjoy the sun, we were advised to turn to Dvor. At first it looked really, but really, fancy. But it turned out to be more peaceful and relaxed than we could ever imagine. An oasis. A small family run butique hotel that has reacently opened. As I understood, they were buying and renovationg old houses for the last three years. I really wish them all the best, because they did a great job! So, we orderd some house wine and snacks. And oh boy… they make their own olive oil and serve it with a special spice mixture. We literally devoured the bread by dipping it into olive oil and the spices. TOP!

We left in the afternoon, slowly cruising down between the hills, just as the sun, heading towards the sea. We arrived in Izola just in time to see the sun disappear on the horizon.

We had dinner at hotel Marina, as part of a Restaurant week. I must admit, there were some pretty amazing dishes, at least as starters concerned and their dessert was delicieux. The next morning we walked down the beach, went for an ice cream and headed towards home.

Before returning, there was one last stop to make. We were on our way to Kras. A world apart. We stopped at Brestovica, where every year there is an Asparagus festival. The locals pick up wild asparagus that grow in the region and than prepare typical dishes, one of the most known being frtalja. It’s basically big egg omelette with wild asparagus and pieces of pancetta or prosciutto.

We left towards home tired and happy, full of great memories and determined to start making plans for a new trip very soon.

And I’m leaving you with a recipe to make this delicious frtalja, dreaming of sun, spring and all the fun yet to come!

Frtalja with wild asparagus

  • 3 eggs
  • 2 Tbsp flour
  • 3 Tbsp milk
  • wild asparagus (don’t be stingy!)
  • pancetta cubes (optioonal)
  • salt
  • pepper
  • 1 – 2 Tbsp olive oil

* You can also make frtalja by using eggs only, without adding flour or milk. And you can add some fresh herbs to the batter too.


  1. Whisk together eggs, flour, milk and salt. Set aside.
  2. Clean asparagus – remove the woody bottom parts. Cut into bigger pieces.
  3. Heat olive oil in a large skillet. Add asparagus and pancetta and stir fry for a minute or two.
  4. Add egg batter. You should make a big thick omelette. Bake until golden brown on both sides.
  5. Cut in triangles and season with pepper.


Easter bread, spring and sunshine


It’s funny how all my life people have been telling me I had no sense for writing. Today I write a blog. And blogging mostly is about writing. Or I might just be writing some nonsense that no one is reading… That’s fine too. At least I’m leaving traces behind me. One way or another, it’s true, the words don’t get here out of nowhere. Usually it’s the image that inspires me to write something down. A brief episode. A distant memory. A life worth living.

As I was looking at this photo it made me think of my grandparent’s Easter bread. My grandparents actually owned a bakery. And the most important thing for them was quality and good ingredients. You can’t make good bread out of nothing. True.

Flour has changed. Food has changed. Gluten is an issue, lactose is an issue, sugar is an issue. And probably, we have changed too.

I set off my blog as something to reinvent traditional recipes. But Easter time is special. And I’m saying this without any religious intentions. I don’t see all my family as often as I would like to, so I love it when we all gather at least for Christmas and Easter. I respect this family tradition and I recpect traditional recipes that go along it. It’s all about gathering, sharing and enjoing the moment. And so is bread.

My Easter braid variations:

Basic recipe for Easter braid


  • 500 g wheat flour T400
  • 60 g sugar*
  • 1 tsp salt
  • 30 g fresh yeast
  • 80 g softened butter
  • 1,8 – 2,2 dl warm milk*
  • 1 egg + 3 egg yolks
  • 2 Tbsp rum
  • peel of 1 organic lemon
  • egg yolk + 2 Tbsp of milk for brushing

* I used 40 g of honey instead and it was sweet enough. The quantity of milk depends largley on the quality of the flour. Plus if using honey, you will need a bit less liquid. Add gradually! Also, you can replace flour with another one, like spelt or wholegrain, but do use at least one half of flour T400.


  1. Mix fresh yeast, 50 ml warm milk and one tablespoon of honey. Let double in volume.
  2. In a big bowl combine the two flours and salt.
  3. In a seperate bowl mix softened butter using a hand mixer. Gradually add eggs, rum and lemon peel.
  4. Mix the rest of the milk and the rest of the honey so it dissolves evenly.
  5. Add yeast and egg mixture to the flours. Add milk gradually, not all at once. Mix with wooden spatula. When the ingredients start to combine, start kneading. Flour the working surface. It takes something like 8 – 10 mins for gluten to activate, so you’ll be probably kneading for about 10 mins. The dough should be firm and silky.
  6. Let rise. When doubled in volume, divide in three equal parts and knead once more. Make three rolls and braid. Let rise once again.
  7. Before baking, brush with mixture of egg yolk and two tablespoons of milk.
  8. Preheat oven at 200°c and place in a baking tray filled with water to create steam. Bake for 10 mins, than lover the temperature to 180°c and bake for another 15 – 20 mins.